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Best desktop computer + monitor setup for a translator (Aug 2014)
Շարքի հրապարակողը: Hans Geluk

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
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A few points Aug 26, 2014

Lincoln Hui wrote:
I find a 1920x1080 single monitor setup quite fine - though I don't actually have enough space in my room for a second monitor. But having to turn your head instead of just your eyeballs can become a pain.


I found that out when I switched from CRT to flat screen. My CRT was 15", and I had a chance to try borrowed a 21" CRT monitor for three weeks. Indeed, it caused some pain/strain in the neck, so I chose a 19" (4:3) flat screen, and I'm still happily using it.

Hans Geluk wrote:
Hilarious that a DVD-writer now costs under 15 quid!


I do lots of video work, so I have three DVD-RW drives installed in my computer. A short description of each might give you some ideas:

1. Sony - The finest, however its laser got tired after years of heavy work. It won't burn a full disk any more, will flop if it goes beyond 2.5 GB. A new one (#3 below) is cheaper than repair.

2. LG - A friend whose occupation is scientific & industrial instrumentation repair told me that LGs are the best DVD readers. They read badly scratched disks better than any other, and will even read DVDs recorded on LG burners. Quite often I get disks from clients that only the LG can read. I call them to ask whether their DVD recorder is an LG, and in such cases of disk unreadability it always is (likely reason being that LG drives are the #1 cheapest here in Brazil).

3. Asus - Apparently it's a rebranded Toshiba, which is gradually taking over the #1 Sony's job.

Orrin Cummins wrote:

4. Graphics card is not important at all if you don't plan to do any gaming.


I had a recent experience with that. My third NVidia board went kaput, it would only run smoothly if set as a plain vanilla VGA. Though it has its own fan, and I had carefully applied the thermal paste between the chip and the heat sink, it failed. I saw so much activity in reballing NVidia chips, that I came to the conclusion that they had packed just too much in that tiny thing, so it overheats.

In VGA mode, WordFast was significantly slower. As I ascertained later, its sluggishness was caused by the time it took to render the image on the screen. (For the record, the trouble with this third NVidia board was a blown capacitor, not GPU overheating.)

I decided to buy a new video board that were not NVidia. Okay, I went to one store, they only had NVidias, 512 MB for a certain price. On the next store they had a Radeon board, from AMD, with 2 GB... for a bit over one quarter (yes, 1/4) of that price! No point in stating actual amounts in BRL here. It has just a heat sink, no fan of its own, and doesn't overheat (touched it right now to check). They offered me a no-questions-asked refund within 7 days, if I were not happy with it. Well, I am! Now WordFast goes whizzing at lightning speed again, possibly faster.

Just a few inputs, hope they help.


 

Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
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It has to do with the manufacturing chain Aug 26, 2014

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

Though it has its own fan, and I had carefully applied the thermal paste between the chip and the heat sink, it failed. I saw so much activity in reballing NVidia chips, that I came to the conclusion that they had packed just too much in that tiny thing, so it overheats.


The problem is that aside from building their own retail cards (sold under the "GeForce" name), NVidia also licenses the chips to "board partners" who in turn design cards to host the chips and sell them at retail themselves. NVidia doesn't really have much input in how these board partners actually build the board, I don't think, beyond some general guidelines.

Sometimes a board partner will actually design something better than the GeForce packaging, but then some of them attempt to lower costs by lowering the quality of cooling components. When that happens, what should have been a stable chipset suddenly starts overheating and failing.

After I settled on a chipset, I did a lot of searching to figure out which board partner's product to ultimately go with, and a lot of that had to do with temperature benchmark performance when the card was under heavy load. But just to be safe I think I might eventually add a liquid cooling system to be sure. Just to see what I mean about the differences in cooling, check out the cooler on the "GeForce" from NVidia and the MSI GTX 760 that I ordered.

All of that is definitely overkill for a machine only used for translation and standard web-browsing fare though. Skyrim, on the other hand...

[Edited at 2014-08-26 14:29 GMT]


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
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It makes sense Aug 26, 2014

Orrin Cummins wrote:

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

Though it has its own fan, and I had carefully applied the thermal paste between the chip and the heat sink, it failed. I saw so much activity in reballing NVidia chips, that I came to the conclusion that they had packed just too much in that tiny thing, so it overheats.


The problem is that aside from building their own retail cards (sold under the "GeForce" name), NVidia also licenses the chips to "board partners" who in turn design cards to host the chips and sell them at retail themselves. NVidia doesn't really have much input in how these board partners actually build the board, I don't think, beyond some general guidelines.


For the record, all my three failed boards were genuine GeForces.

However this entire experience led me to realize the fallacy of investing in a powerful CPU (the main computer processor) and throttling its output with a lame GPU (the graphics processor on the video board).

Our major working tool, Microsoft Word, unfortunately the translation market standard, drains more processing power, and takes over more memory than any other program I know, including several resource-laden nonlinear audio and video editing/rendering apps, so a video board intended for "heavy gaming" is, to some extent, justified for translation work.


 

Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
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It's true, identifying the bottleneck is critical Aug 26, 2014

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

Orrin Cummins wrote:

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

Though it has its own fan, and I had carefully applied the thermal paste between the chip and the heat sink, it failed. I saw so much activity in reballing NVidia chips, that I came to the conclusion that they had packed just too much in that tiny thing, so it overheats.


The problem is that aside from building their own retail cards (sold under the "GeForce" name), NVidia also licenses the chips to "board partners" who in turn design cards to host the chips and sell them at retail themselves. NVidia doesn't really have much input in how these board partners actually build the board, I don't think, beyond some general guidelines.


For the record, all my three failed boards were genuine GeForces.

However this entire experience led me to realize the fallacy of investing in a powerful CPU (the main computer processor) and throttling its output with a lame GPU (the graphics processor on the video board).

Our major working tool, Microsoft Word, unfortunately the translation market standard, drains more processing power, and takes over more memory than any other program I know, including several resource-laden nonlinear audio and video editing/rendering apps, so a video board intended for "heavy gaming" is, to some extent, justified for translation work.


That's surprising...must have been some particularly bad design generations. I've switched back and forth between ATi and NVidia over the years, so I think I got lucky and avoided some lemon chipsets along the way. A lot of the newer motherboards have some pretty respectable graphics adapters (for non-gaming) on them, but chances are most translators aren't using a $200 motherboard, I guess.

I couldn't agree with you more about Word, it's ridiculous how much resources it uses. Trados is no slouch either, but not horrible I guess. Add everything together though and the fact is that the outdated systems that many people are running are not really designed to handle what their users are throwing at them.

Ultimately it's all about finding the bottleneck for a particular system. As you stated, shelling out $400 for a Core i7 but then using a substandard onboard graphics card (which is what usually comes on substandard motherboards) doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

On the other hand, I've seen people post about their $1000 graphics setup with dual flagship video cards running in SLI...but they are using a crappy $150 monitor. I just don't get it.

If I had to place a bet though, I would say the bottleneck for the vast majority of people is going to be the mechanical HDD. This is going to change as more and more older computers finally crap out and people have the impetus to upgrade to SSD, but that's going to take a while.

Unless you are Bitcoin mining, rendering a lot of video, doing graphics design, running CPU-intensive mathematical simulations, etc., you aren't really going to see much benefit to going above a Haswell-generation i5 and 8 GB of RAM. At that point, an SSD is probably the only way to get any noticeable gains in performance.


 

Henning Holthusen  Identity Verified
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Get as much monitor space as you can Aug 30, 2014

My experience is that you want to have as much monitor space as you can. My current setup consists of two 27" displays, one with 2560x1440 (1440p) and the other a standard 1080p.
On the 1440p, text looks much nicer because of the much higher pixel density.

If your desk is too small to accomodate 2 monitors, you should get a monitor arm like this:

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My experience is that you want to have as much monitor space as you can. My current setup consists of two 27" displays, one with 2560x1440 (1440p) and the other a standard 1080p.
On the 1440p, text looks much nicer because of the much higher pixel density.

If your desk is too small to accomodate 2 monitors, you should get a monitor arm like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Mount-It-Articulating-Computer-Monitors-MI-752/dp/B0052AWGLE/ref=sr_1_12?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1409387913&sr=1-12

More monitor space means you can have the source document, your internet browser, electronic dictionaries etc. all open at the same time.

I plan on transitioning to a 3860x2160 display next year. I'll probably just buy a TV and use that as a monitor.

If you want a single monitor, you could get this:

http://www.amazon.com/LG-Electronics-34UM95-34-Inch-LED-Lit/dp/B00JR6GCZA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409388396&sr=8-1&keywords=34UM95

or this:

http://www.amazon.com/BenQ-BL3200PT-32-Inch-LED-Lit-Monitor/dp/B00ITORMNM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409388487&sr=8-1&keywords=BL3200PT


As for my computer, I'm using an Alienware 17 laptop. I don't need a UPS and I can pack up my laptop and take my work somewhere else at a moment's notice.
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Lincoln Hui  Identity Verified
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Notebooks Aug 30, 2014

Since I've done my part I'm going to hijack this thread a little bit for some notebook advice. This will be my secondary computer (primary is a desktop), and it's going to be used for play as well as work. I've seen that some notebooks I've seen carry a hybrid HDD with 8GB cache, but the HDD itself is 5400rpm. How do these drives compare to 7200rpm drives?

 

Paulette Romero  Identity Verified
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File backup? Aug 30, 2014

Hans Geluk wrote:

.

COMPUTER:

I am looking to buy a new desktop PC that I will use as my primary computer. I already have quite some idea about the specs, but would like some advice for in case I am overlooking something. I would look into a PC with the following specifications:
    • Intel i7 processor (maybe i7-4770)
    • min. 8 GB RAM (upgradable to at least 16 GB)
    • min. 1 TB hard disk
    • preferrably an SDD for a quick startup
    • min. 4 USB 3.0 ports
    • 2x DisplayPort for the screens
    • decent graphics (I may need some advice on this!)
    • a backup power supply for power cuts (only Asus offers that)
    • as silent and power saving as possible (though powerful when needed)
    • Windows 7 Professional/Ultimate (have Windows 8.1 on my laptop, don't specially like it)



More importantly, what are you going to use to backup your files? Dropbox, Carbonite, external hard drive? Having fancy hardware is nice but if your HDD dies and it's not backed up anywhere you won't be able to recover your work.

I'm surprised at the complaints I've read for using two monitors. I have two monitors and wouldn't go back to using just one.


 

Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
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... Aug 30, 2014

Lincoln Hui wrote:

Since I've done my part I'm going to hijack this thread a little bit for some notebook advice. This will be my secondary computer (primary is a desktop), and it's going to be used for play as well as work. I've seen that some notebooks I've seen carry a hybrid HDD with 8GB cache, but the HDD itself is 5400rpm. How do these drives compare to 7200rpm drives?


Wouldn't you be better of getting a laptop with a bigger SSD instead? I don't know much about hybrid drives but if you mean only 8 GB is solid state then that doesn't seem worth it, especially if the mechanical portion is creeping along at 5400 rpm...

You can get a 200-GB SSD for less than $200 now, or a 140-ish GB drive for like 130 bucks. I really think you'd be crippling yourself if you went with a mechanical drive at all--you can always get a multi-terabyte slower HDD and stick it on the network if you need more long-term storage, and that would be a hell of a lot cheaper cost per megabyte anyway.


 

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Curious about two monitors Aug 30, 2014

I'm curious about this two monitors thing.

I have a monitor that's wide enough for me to see two A4 pages side by side.

What advantage does having two monitors bring?


 

Lincoln Hui  Identity Verified
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Specifics Aug 30, 2014

Orrin Cummins wrote:

Lincoln Hui wrote:

Since I've done my part I'm going to hijack this thread a little bit for some notebook advice. This will be my secondary computer (primary is a desktop), and it's going to be used for play as well as work. I've seen that some notebooks I've seen carry a hybrid HDD with 8GB cache, but the HDD itself is 5400rpm. How do these drives compare to 7200rpm drives?


Wouldn't you be better of getting a laptop with a bigger SSD instead? I don't know much about hybrid drives but if you mean only 8 GB is solid state then that doesn't seem worth it, especially if the mechanical portion is creeping along at 5400 rpm...

You can get a 200-GB SSD for less than $200 now, or a 140-ish GB drive for like 130 bucks. I really think you'd be crippling yourself if you went with a mechanical drive at all--you can always get a multi-terabyte slower HDD and stick it on the network if you need more long-term storage, and that would be a hell of a lot cheaper cost per megabyte anyway.

To be specific I'm looking at two models:
http://xoffer.hk/product.php?p=2014hkua&pt=1&a=&t=&i=1762
http://xoffer.hk/product.php?p=2014hkua&pt=1&a=&t=&i=2169

The first one has more horsepower for non-work related purposes and costs about $200 USD less. The second one is lighter with an SSD+HDD combination but has a less powerful graphics card. There are several factors at work here, so what I'm looking at is whether the hybrid drive is fast enough that I can live with it. I'm fine with a 7200rpm mechanical drive, but not a 5400rpm one.

This is part of a university special offer so I'm not sure they can be customized. I'm also none too hot about machines that only have a small internal SSD drive and have to frequently rely on an external HDD.


 

Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
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I see Aug 31, 2014

Lincoln Hui wrote:

Orrin Cummins wrote:

Lincoln Hui wrote:

Since I've done my part I'm going to hijack this thread a little bit for some notebook advice. This will be my secondary computer (primary is a desktop), and it's going to be used for play as well as work. I've seen that some notebooks I've seen carry a hybrid HDD with 8GB cache, but the HDD itself is 5400rpm. How do these drives compare to 7200rpm drives?


Wouldn't you be better of getting a laptop with a bigger SSD instead? I don't know much about hybrid drives but if you mean only 8 GB is solid state then that doesn't seem worth it, especially if the mechanical portion is creeping along at 5400 rpm...

You can get a 200-GB SSD for less than $200 now, or a 140-ish GB drive for like 130 bucks. I really think you'd be crippling yourself if you went with a mechanical drive at all--you can always get a multi-terabyte slower HDD and stick it on the network if you need more long-term storage, and that would be a hell of a lot cheaper cost per megabyte anyway.

To be specific I'm looking at two models:
http://xoffer.hk/product.php?p=2014hkua&pt=1&a=&t=&i=1762
http://xoffer.hk/product.php?p=2014hkua&pt=1&a=&t=&i=2169

The first one has more horsepower for non-work related purposes and costs about $200 USD less. The second one is lighter with an SSD+HDD combination but has a less powerful graphics card. There are several factors at work here, so what I'm looking at is whether the hybrid drive is fast enough that I can live with it. I'm fine with a 7200rpm mechanical drive, but not a 5400rpm one.

This is part of a university special offer so I'm not sure they can be customized. I'm also none too hot about machines that only have a small internal SSD drive and have to frequently rely on an external HDD.


OK, I had a feeling you might be looking at specific models.

Looking at the specs for those Nitros it seems that you can pop in a 128 GB SSD later. I can't tell but it seems you could use that and the hybrid drive that it comes with at the same time. If that is indeed the case, then I personally would go for the slower drive but better graphics card. You can run Windows on the 8 GB solid-state portion of the hybrid (I'm assuming that's the way it will come set up) then put your games and important programs on a 128 GB SSD that you purchase and add in whenever. Then you can just use the 5400-rpm mechanical part of the hybrid for long-term storage.

Something else to consider is that the Nitro weighs significantly more, although if you won't be lugging it around a lot it doesn't matter that much I guess. It also has a bigger screen if I am looking correctly, and that's important for everything you do on it.

So taking all of this into account I would say that if you can save 200 bucks getting the first one then you could use some of that money to get an SSD to add in later, leaving you with a computer with a bigger screen and better graphics card. Think about it like this: you can always get that SSD when you get tired of the 5400-rpm reads and writes, but you can't upgrade the graphics system when you aren't getting the frames per second that you want.


 

Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
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Just a thought: get a powerful laptop (desktops are no longer necessary) Aug 31, 2014

I recently did the whole buying-a-new-work-computer thing, and decided to replace my previous huge PC desktop with a super-powered laptop. I already had a huge screen, so I use that when at home, and just take the laptop when traveling. My laptop is very quiet, very powerful, and was around £1,500. It's actually much quieter and faster than my previous water-cooled monster desktop.

I got a Dell Precision M6800 (Dell calls it ‘The world’s most powerful 17" W
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I recently did the whole buying-a-new-work-computer thing, and decided to replace my previous huge PC desktop with a super-powered laptop. I already had a huge screen, so I use that when at home, and just take the laptop when traveling. My laptop is very quiet, very powerful, and was around £1,500. It's actually much quieter and faster than my previous water-cooled monster desktop.

I got a Dell Precision M6800 (Dell calls it ‘The world’s most powerful 17" Workstation’, and after using it for a few months I can't disagree.)

I got a refurbished one for approx. £1,000 less on eBay. It's brand new, and with 2 year Dell (Next Business Day On-Site) warranty.

It has space for 3 hard drives (if you remove the useless DVD drive): I have
1×1TB hybrid HD (Backup)
1× 500GB Samsung 840 Pro SSD (C:)(a SSD will be the most important way to speed up any computer these days)
1× 250GB SSD (for virtual machines; to run OS X)

I have:
– 16Gb of super-fast RAM
– i7 (Haswell)
– two graphics cards: they switch on or off automatically depending on what you are doing.
– Windows 7 64-bit (= the best work OS ever; Macs are pretty but have zero business/work software)
– amazing (1920×1200) 17" screen
– great, full-sized keyboard

Looks like this:

http://www.dell.com/uk/business/p/precision-m6800-workstation/pd
http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/reviews/laptop/3504972/dell-precision-m6800-mobile-workstation-review/

Michael

A small note about screens: I do not recommend any of those snazzy new Retina or Retina-type screens. Those resolutions are WAY too high for office work. Nice for watching movies maybe, but your programs and text are going to look awful. I recommend: get the biggest screen you can afford (laptop: no smaller than 17"), and watch out with the resolutions. If you don't believe me, try looking at memoQ on a Retina screen.


[Edited at 2014-08-31 04:00 GMT]

[Edited at 2014-08-31 04:01 GMT]
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Eirik Birkeland  Identity Verified
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Some general advice for purchasing a stable and powerful custom PC Sep 1, 2014

These are the considerations I made recently when purchasing my own backup work computer.

Suggested setup for a stable and upgradeable mid-range Intel system running Win 7/8:

Graphics card: If you intend to do just translating work, frankly the built-in Intel 4000 or similar might suffice. You'd just need to check if your mobo/CPU combo supports monitors without a dedicated graphics card. Using the built-in graphics would be a simple way of shaving off $100-200 and spen
... See more
These are the considerations I made recently when purchasing my own backup work computer.

Suggested setup for a stable and upgradeable mid-range Intel system running Win 7/8:

Graphics card: If you intend to do just translating work, frankly the built-in Intel 4000 or similar might suffice. You'd just need to check if your mobo/CPU combo supports monitors without a dedicated graphics card. Using the built-in graphics would be a simple way of shaving off $100-200 and spending those dollars on more critical components. If it turns out some tasks are a little too slow, you can always pick up a card later.

Also, if you do get a budget range graphics card ($50-200), be aware that some graphics cards are equipped with extremely cheap fans that might get worn out after just 1-2 years. Perhaps these are not common anymore, but I wouldn't count on it. For non-graphical applications such as Trados, MemoQ, Word or whatever other tools, I suggest spending ~$100 on getting a fanless card that is intended for office applications. Getting a fanless one means one less thing that can go wrong.

-Motherboard (~$100-150): Any good Intel 1150 socket mobo – getting a recent model w/ a 1150 socket ensures that you can upgrade your CPU in a few years to a monster-CPU if needed! Decide on the motherboard according to user ratings to ensure it's reliable, just in case. Usually, the price tag of motherboards is according to the amount of features. For example, more expensive motherboards may have built-in wifi, internal harddrive connectors, and more monitor outputs for the built-in graphics. There is no particular "rule" for shopping mobos except you have to make sure the socket matches your CPU!!

-CPU: i3 or higher (do get the newer 1150 socket, and not the old 1155 (~$100-150): For CPU/mobo make sure that the socket is the same. 1150 is not compatible with 1155 and vice versa!! Caveat emptor: 1150 is actually the new generation of sockets, while 1155 is the old! Those naming schemes never make sense.

-Memory (~$100): 8 GB is a great choice you can't go wrong with. You could get away with having just 4 GB of RAM, but that will soon be obsolete. It seems "so 2008" to get that these days. With 8 gigs you're set to keep up with software progress over the next 5 years, I think. Personally I've had 16 GB for 2 years now, and it allows me to run 100's of Chrome tabs at the same time... (not really a good thing)

Warning: *Never* get the cheapest available unbranded memory modules. A stable system should be your main priority, since pretty much any $600 setup these days will suffice for translation. Between the choice of some extra power you probably don't need, and having a rock solid system that will crash at most 3 times a year, I think the choice is a no-brainer. Personally, I only get Corsair modules (Corsair has for a long time been a popular choice for overclocking/stability.)

-Storage (~$150 or ~300): Of course anything works for translating, but how about a 250 GB SSD? For work 120 GB might suffice, but the Windows installation itself is known to swalloy A LOT of space, especially after a few years of the user installing software. Also, get an extra 3 or 4 TB WD Green drive if you need extra space. It's quiet and low power, and provides one of the cheapest $ per GB these days.

-Power supply ($100): Again, quality is absolutely crucial! A $30 no-brand supply could cause your computer to crash... fires, etc. Corsair has become my first choice here as well. Since you won't be running a monstrous graphics card for gaming, a 500w power supply should offer plenty of power. I'd advice on getting at least 500w in-case you want a system that can be upgraded with a more power-hungry CPU, more harddrives, etc. in the future. Also, you might as well try to find a power-efficient one, to save on electricity and save the trees. The current power efficiency certification for power supplies is called "80 Plus": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_Plus

-Case: One without sharp edges inside to cut your fingers on! If you get a pre-built system it might not matter much, but there is a strong argument to be made for removable dust filters. I think the fate of many computers is that the CPU fan gradually accumulates more dust, until after a few years the cooling performance becomes insufficent on a warm summer, and the computer starts crashing. Without dust filters you should remove dust from inside the computer at least before every summer season!

Let me know if you want any questions answered or need more concrete suggestions.
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Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
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Agree with Eirik: get a fanless graphics card! Sep 1, 2014

If possible, get a fanless graphics card. Although my new laptop is virtually silent, I replaced the graphics card in my previous computer, the desktop I mentioned in my previous post, with a fanless model and got rid of around 70% of the computer's noise in one fell swoop. Be careful though as they are never quite as powerful as ‘normal’ ones. I got this one: ... See more
If possible, get a fanless graphics card. Although my new laptop is virtually silent, I replaced the graphics card in my previous computer, the desktop I mentioned in my previous post, with a fanless model and got rid of around 70% of the computer's noise in one fell swoop. Be careful though as they are never quite as powerful as ‘normal’ ones. I got this one: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sapphire-11190-12-20G-HD6450-Retail-Graphics/dp/B006GTDSC6 and it was able to handle anything I threw at it without breaking a sweat.

Michael
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Hans Geluk  Identity Verified
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Laptop + graphics Sep 1, 2014

Michael Beijer wrote:

I recently did the whole buying-a-new-work-computer thing, and decided to replace my previous huge PC desktop with a super-powered laptop.


You really have made me doubt again! But I want a clean and empty desk. I am working right now with my laptop + second screen + keyboard + mouse and it is kind of messy! So I think it's ideal to have a desktop computer for working at home. I will keep a backup of everything on an external drive (and I will save all except confidential stuff on the cloud too). So I can work elsewhere on my laptop too.

As it stands, I think I will buy one 24" screen (1920x1200) and one 19" screen (1280x1024). That should really give me the workspace I need. I went to a store and saw the iMac 21 and 27 next to each other. I think a 27" screen would give me headache, it's just too much! The 21" screen seemed fit for purpose, though a little smallish. So that brings me to 23-24"

Eirik Birkeland wrote:

These are the considerations I made recently when purchasing my own backup work computer.


Thanks, Eirik, for your useful advice. I think I will go for a pre-built machine (possibly an Asus), but I will check its components (memory, CPU, etc. against your advice. I agree with you and Michael that a fanless card is great, because I hate computers that sound like an old fridge in action.

I will certainly post any further doubts I have. Thanks!


 
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Best desktop computer + monitor setup for a translator (Aug 2014)

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